Reproduction 

Mayes and Scrine can provide a complete veterinary service for all breeders - whether you are an experienced stud manager or breeding from your mare for the first time. A number of our vets are experienced in equine reproduction.

Artificial Insemination (AI)

Mayes & Scrine is a British Equine Veterinary Association list of Approved AI Practices. AI is increasingly popular due to a wider choice of stallions, reduced risk of injury and infection and practicalities when stallions are some distance away. We offer chilled and frozen AI, either at home or here at the clinic (where grass livery is available).

Chilled AI involves scanning the mare regularly and ordering semen (from the UK or abroad) at the correct time for each mare.

Frozen AI requires an increased number of scans as timing is critical, semen is ordered in advance and can be stored at the practice.

We offer fixed-priced packages for chilled and frozen AI. For more information on prices and what this includes please contact the practice.

Mayes and Scrine Equine Reproduction  

Natural Cover

Studs will require swabs and blood tests to establish a mare is free from disease prior to cover. Requirements vary so we can advise on which tests are required so the mare goes to stud with the correct laboratory certificates. 

Pre-breeding examination

We recommend a pre-breeding examination, to include an ultrasound scan and vaginal examination (+/- swabs or biopsies) before a mare is bred. This will allow the vet to establish a mare’s suitability for breeding, any problems that should be anticipated and at what stage of the oestrus cycle she is in, so breeding can be planned and any hormone medications administered. 

 

Mayes and Scrine Equine Reproduction  Mayes and Scrine Equine Reproduction

Pregnancy Diagnosis

Ideally mares should be scanned for pregnancy at 14 days post-insemination (or last day of covering). This early detection of twins which are rarely viable in the horse and are most easily addressed before 16 days. 

A second ultrasound is then carried out at 28 days to detect the embryo’s heartbeat and further examinations after this allow for monitoring of embryo development. 

Manual rectal examination can also be carried out from four-five months. 

Blood samples can also be used within specific time frames for those mares that are not candidates for scanning (eg. miniatures).